THE RIVER FAUGHaN

The River Faughan flows through a valley of glacial origin with large deposits of sand and gravel present throughout the catchment. Rising on the western slopes of the Sperrin Mountain range the river flows in a north-westerly direction where it is eventually discharged into Lough Foyle.
Land use is predominantly marginal rough grazing in the uplands moving to lowland grazing and arable in the lower reaches. The River Faughan and tributaries have a channel length of approximately 66 km.
The Faughan catchment is impacted upon by a wide range of factors. A diverse array of impacts include amongst others, agriculture, sand and gravel extraction, commercial forestry, commercial and recreational fishing, industry, water abstraction, sewage treatment, diffuse and point source pollution, invasive plant species, urban sprawl and flood defences.
The River Faughan varies in visual character from its source at an altitude of more than 500 m on Sawel Mountain, the highest of the Sperrin Mountains, to where it enters Lough Foyle at Lower Campsie. From its catchment area in the Sperrin Mountains, an area of open moorland vegetation, with its associated high acidity and peaty flush, the river passes through quiet pastoral scenes with mature wooded banks and the urban settlements of Park, Claudy and Drumahoe. The Faughan finally reaches the Foyle at Lower Campsie, 29 miles from its source.
The Faughan is used as a source of drinking water for the city of Derry-Londonderry and surrounding area. Water is pumped from the river, immediately above Campsie Dam to a treatment works in Carnmoney.
The River Faughan is part of the Foyle system which is one of the most prolific salmon rivers in Europe. It is one of the most natural rivers in Northern Ireland in common with most of the rivers flowing from the Sperrins. The naturalness of the Sperrin rivers is associated with low intensity agriculture and overall lack of human influence.
 

Tributaries

(click image to view map PDF)

Glenrandal
A tributary which runs from high in the Sperrins over metamorphic rock to near Claudy. Upland river running through moorland and bog in step-pool sequence. Downstream sections have good sections of adjacent marsh and carr.

Bonds Glen
A small river which joins the Faughan just outside Claudy, runs over metamorphic rock and is reasonably unaltered. It runs through broad-leaved mixed woodland and improved grassland.

Foreglen
A small meandering natural river which flows over metamorphic rocks.

Burntollet
There are two ASSI designations along this upland river which enters the Faughan below Killaloo. The river is reasonably unaltered as it runs through rough pasture in the upper reaches and mixed woodland in the lower section. The river dramatically changes its character at Ness Woods where it has cut a bedrock gorge with notable waterfalls.

The River Faughan flows through a valley of glacial origin with large deposits of sand and gravel present throughout the catchment. Rising on the western slopes of the Sperrin Mountain range the river flows in a north-westerly direction where it is eventually discharged into Lough Foyle.
Land use is predominantly marginal rough grazing in the uplands moving to lowland grazing and arable in the lower reaches. The River Faughan and tributaries have a channel length of approximately 66 km.
The Faughan catchment is impacted upon by a wide range of factors. A diverse array of impacts include amongst others, agriculture, sand and gravel extraction, commercial forestry, commercial and recreational fishing, industry, water abstraction, sewage treatment, diffuse and point source pollution, invasive plant species, urban sprawl and flood defences.
The River Faughan varies in visual character from its source at an altitude of more than 500 m on Sawel Mountain, the highest of the Sperrin Mountains, to where it enters Lough Foyle at Lower Campsie. From its catchment area in the Sperrin Mountains, an area of open moorland vegetation, with its associated high acidity and peaty flush, the river passes through quiet pastoral scenes with mature wooded banks and the urban settlements of Park, Claudy and Drumahoe. The Faughan finally reaches the Foyle at Lower Campsie, 29 miles from its source.
The Faughan is used as a source of drinking water for the city of Derry-Londonderry and surrounding area. Water is pumped from the river, immediately above Campsie Dam to a treatment works in Carnmoney.
The River Faughan is part of the Foyle system which is one of the most prolific salmon rivers in Europe. It is one of the most natural rivers in Northern Ireland in common with most of the rivers flowing from the Sperrins. The naturalness of the Sperrin rivers is associated with low intensity agriculture and overall lack of human influence.
 

Tributaries

(click image to view map PDF)

Glenrandal
A tributary which runs from high in the Sperrins over metamorphic rock to near Claudy. Upland river running through moorland and bog in step-pool sequence. Downstream sections have good sections of adjacent marsh and carr.

Bonds Glen
A small river which joins the Faughan just outside Claudy, runs over metamorphic rock and is reasonably unaltered. It runs through broad-leaved mixed woodland and improved grassland.

Foreglen
A small meandering natural river which flows over metamorphic rocks.

Burntollet
There are two ASSI designations along this upland river which enters the Faughan below Killaloo. The river is reasonably unaltered as it runs through rough pasture in the upper reaches and mixed woodland in the lower section. The river dramatically changes its character at Ness Woods where it has cut a bedrock gorge with notable waterfalls.